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P1136 Women and Heart Disease

Metabolic syndrome: A health problem that occurs when a person has three or more of the following: low HDL cholesterol; high triglycerides; high blood pressure; high blood sugar; extra weight around the waist. This syndrome puts you at extra high risk of heart disease. Monounsaturated fat: A healthier type of dietary fat that may help lower your “bad” cholesterol level. Myocardial infarction (MI): Another term for heart attack. This occurs when the blood supply to the heart is cut off, resulting in permanent damage to the heart muscle. (The myocardium is the thick middle layer of the heart muscle.) Peripheral arterial disease (PAD): A type of vascular (blood vessel) disease that affects the arteries supplying blood to the legs. Plaque: Fatty deposits that build up inside the arteries and reduce blood flow. Polyunsaturated fat: The healthiest type of fat. It’s found in some oils (such as olive, peanut, and canola), nuts, seeds, and fish. Unsaturated fat can be good for your heart in moderate amounts. Pre-hypertension: Blood pressure that is higher than normal, but not high enough to be called high blood pressure (hypertension). Saturated fat: A type of fat that raises blood cholesterol. It’s mostly found in foods from animal sources, such as butter, lard, fatty cuts of beef, and high-fat dairy. This fat should be limited as much as possible because it’s bad for your heart. Silent heart attack: A heart attack without any symptoms; ischemia without pain. Also called a “silent MI” or “silent ischemia.” Stent: A tiny wire-mesh tube inserted into a blocked artery to help keep it open. Stroke: Occurs when blood flow is cut off by blockage or rupture in a blood vessel supplying the brain. Brain damage results. Trans fat: A type of fat found in french fries and other fast food, snack foods (such as chips and cookies), and some margarines and shortenings. This is the worst fat for your heart and should be avoided. Transient ischemic attack (TIA): A temporary blockage of blood supplying the brain, causing stroke-like symptoms. Triglycerides: A type of fat measured in the blood along with cholesterol. High triglyceride levels are a risk factor for heart attack and stroke. 55


P1136 Women and Heart Disease
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