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P1136 Women and Heart Disease

Shopping and dining out Healthy eating starts with healthy food shopping. Pay attention to food labels and make healthy choices as you shop. Make a list before you enter the store and stick to it—avoid impulse buys. These tips can help you make heart-healthy choices: 77 Start your shopping in the produce section. You can trim fat by building meals around produce instead of meat. And fresh fruits and vegetables contain almost no sodium. 77 In the meat section, try chicken or fish instead of red meat. Remember, beans, tofu or nuts are also good alternatives to meat. Avoid meats that are cured or smoked; these processes Healthy Diet: add a lot of sodium. Dos & Don’ts Shopping 77 Try lower-fat dairy products. If you usually buy whole milk, try Look for: ■■ Bright colored fruits and reduced fat or 1% instead. 77 Snack foods often contain trans fat, so read labels with care. Look for low-fat, low-sodium versions of your favorites. 77 Frozen dinners are often high in fat and sodium. Look for plain frozen foods without sauces. © 2016 WomenHeart, ABC, CardioSmart, and StayWell. All rights reserved. When you dine out, scan the menu for healthy choices. Often, restaurants will make a dish in a healthier way; ask for your order to be cooked without cheese, no added salt or with sauce on the side. Fast food is high in salt and fat, so limit how many times you eat in these restaurants. When you do eat fast food, choose healthier items. Most restaurants have a nutrition list of the foods they serve. Ask for the list at the counter, or it may be on the restaurant’s website. English Español A PATIENT RESOURCE GUIDE Women and Heart Disease Sodium (salt) This is the total amount of sodium in each serving given in milligrams (mg). People with diabetes should try to eat less than 1,400 mg of sodium a day. Healthy Dos & Don’ts Download/print this PDF vegetables ■■ Low fat meats, such as fish, chicken or turkey, and lean beef ■■ Whole grain foods and low-fat dairy (milk) products Avoid: ■■ High fat snack foods Food Labels—look at food labels to check how much makes a serving, and how much fat, salt (sodium) and starches (carbohydrates) are in each serving. Nutrition Facts Serving Size 1 cup (240g) Servings Per Container 2 Amount Per Serving Calories 100 Calories from Fat 20 % Daily Value* Total Fat 2g 3% Saturated Fat 0g 0% Trans Fat 0g Cholesterol 0mg 0% Sodium 70mg 3% Total Carbohydrate 17g 6% Dietary Fiber 3g 12% Sugars 5g Protein 4g Vitamin A 70% • Vitamin C 20% Calcium 15% • Iron 8% *Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your Daily Values may be higher or lower depending on your calorie needs. Serving size This tells you how much of the food makes up one serving. If you eat more than one serving, all the other values increase. Fat This is the total amount of fat in each serving. Limit saturated fats and avoid trans fats. Both are bad for your health. Total carbohydrate (starches) This tells you how many grams of carbohydrate are in one serving. If you do carb counting, this number helps you fit the food into your meal plan. 37


P1136 Women and Heart Disease
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