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P1136 Women and Heart Disease

It’s essential to eat some fats, however, because hormones and your nervous system depend on it to function properly. Some fats, such as monounsaturated (found in olive and canola oils) and polyunsaturated fats (found in sunflower and sesame oils) and omega-3 fatty acids (found in fish), are healthier than saturated and trans fats. You should limit your fat intake to no more than 25 to 30 percent of your daily calories, though. Eating too much salt (sodium) can raise your blood pressure. To cut down on salt: 77 Buy fresh foods or plain frozen foods. Canned and processed foods often have salt added to them. Read the sodium content on the label. 77 Check that seasoning mixes are sodium-free. 77Don’t add salt while cooking. Remove the saltshaker from the table. 77 Limit fast foods and fried foods. The recommended amount of sodium is 1,400 mg per day. If you have high blood pressure or other heart problems, your healthcare provider may lower that amount. Don’t forget the fiber Foods high in fiber make you feel full longer. This can help you control your weight. Eating foods high in soluble fiber (found in peas, beans, oats and some fruit) helps to lower your cholesterol. To add more fiber to your diet: 77 Eat grains, such as oatmeal, brown rice, barley and kasha (buckwheat). Choose whole-grain breads, crackers and cereals. 77 Include fresh vegetables and fruit in your diet. Try raw or lightly steamed vegetables. And eat whole fresh fruit with the skin. 77 Eat dried, cooked beans, peas and lentils instead of meat. Lifestyle Tips: Eating healthy Eat plenty of produce—a moderately active woman should eat at least 3 cups of vegetables and 2 cups of fruits daily. Studies link diets high in fruits and vegetables with lower blood pressure and a reduced risk for heart disease. 35


P1136 Women and Heart Disease
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