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P1215 Women and Heart Disease

C H A P T E R 10 OVERCOMING BARRIERS TO GOOD HEALTH Should you participate in a clinical trial? A clinical trial is a research study that uses human volunteers to try to answer a specific question. Most clinical trials test new treatments that appear to be more effective than current treatments. All U.S. clinical trials must be overseen by an institutional review board (IRB) at each site participating in the research. The IRB helps ensure low risks and proper trial procedures. As a clinical trial participant, you must sign an informed consent document that gives many details about the study and what you can expect. The document doesn’t require you to complete the entire study. You have the right to leave at any time and will be immediately withdrawn if you have negative health effects. Here are the pros to consider: 77 You may be among the first to benefit from a new treatment. 77 You’ll be helping others by contributing to medical research. 77 You’ll be closely monitored and receive high-quality medical care. Weigh those against the cons: 77 Experimental treatments may bring unpleasant or serious side effects. Did you know that: 77 African-American women have higher rates of obesity, physical inactivity, high blood pressure and diabetes? 77 27.9 percent of African-American women are overweight and another 56.5 percent of African American women are obese? 77 among African-American women over age 20, 47.0 percent have high blood pressure? 77 The treatment may not work for you, or it may end up being less effective than the available treatment. 77 Participating may require more of your time and energy than a normal treatment regimen. There may be more tests and healthcare provider visits, complex dosage requirements or hospital stays. 77 Your health plan may not cover all your costs. 77 You may have to change healthcare providers. Before you sign up, talk with your family and your healthcare provider to decide if this is a good option for you. LEARNING CHECK Take a short quiz on what you’ve learned so far. 30 abcardio.org


P1215 Women and Heart Disease
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