Page 20

P1215 Women and Heart Disease

C H A P T E R 7 HEALTHY EATING Eating healthy doesn’t mean your food choices are limited. It’s just a matter of making the right decisions for your heart health. And if you prepare the meals in your household, your healthy choices will be good for the whole family. By eating healthy foods more often, you’ll take a big step toward better health. Most heart disease risk factors are linked to what and how much you eat. Eating healthier will improve cholesterol and blood pressure levels. It can also help you lose extra pounds or maintain a healthy weight. And if you have diabetes, healthy eating can help you manage it. The dangers of fat and salt Saturated fat can clog your arteries and raise your bad (LDL) cholesterol levels. This type of fat comes mostly from animal sources and is found in butter, cheese, whole milk, lard and fatty cuts of meat. Another type of fat that raises your LDL cholesterol is trans fats—fats that have been converted into solids. You can avoid these by eating less shortening, margarine or snacks containing hydrogenated vegetable oil. It’s essential to eat some fats, however, because hormones and your nervous system depend on it to function properly. Some fats, such as monounsaturated (found in olive and canola oils) and polyunsaturated fats (found in sunflower and sesame oils) and omega-3 fatty acids (found in fish), are healthier than saturated and trans fats. You should limit your fat intake to no more than 25 to 30 percent of your daily calories, though. Eating too much salt (sodium) can raise your blood pressure. To cut down on salt: 77 Buy fresh foods or plain frozen foods. Canned and processed foods often have salt added to them. Read the sodium content on the label. 77 Check that seasoning mixes are sodium-free. 77 Don’t add salt while cooking. Remove the saltshaker from the table. 77 Limit fast foods and fried foods. The recommended amount of sodium is 1,500 mg per day, or less than 200 mg per serving size. If you have high blood pressure or other heart problems, your healthcare provider may lower that amount. It is also recommended that you get fewer than 20 grams of carbs and 2 grams of saturated fat per day. 20 abcardio.org


P1215 Women and Heart Disease
To see the actual publication please follow the link above